Anakana Schofield – Author of Martin John and Malarky

Articles

  • Cheating at Canasta: William Trevor review

    Still a master of the story The landing of a new collection by Irish short-story writer William Trevor is a beguiling moment because, as he was born in 1928, the masterful supply we’re so accustomed to will inevitably cease. Trevor’s 17-year background as a wood sculptor has complemented the carving of his prose. He rarely […]

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  • Rereading The Riot Act LRB Blog

    Read the original piece on the London Review of Books Last Wednesday evening, when disappointed hockey fans rioted in the streets of Vancouver, I was at a performance-art cabaret I’d curated called Rereading the Riot Act II, an interrogation of the events of 23 April 1935, when the mayor of Vancouver, Gerry McGeer, read the […]

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  • The book that ruined my life: Anakana Schofield

    The Georgia Straight recently asked me the following question in relation to my appearence on Sunday Sept 29th at The Word on the Street 2012 : Which book changed your life? Below was my response, published on their website and now here. Since March 15, when I published a novel, I have been asked multiple […]

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  • Blue Nights Joan Didion

    Blue Nights Joan Didion “When we talk about mortality we are talking about our children,” Joan Didion writes in her most recent offering, Blue Nights. Blue Nights is the second book of Didion’s recording and consideration of a recent difficult period in her life. Readers of Didion’s previous book, The Year of Magical Thinking, will […]

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  • London Review of Books: In Vancouver

    To read my piece about Occupy Vancouver over at the London Review of Books blog click here

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  • Venus with Biceps: A Pictorial History of Muscular Women by David L. Chapman & Patricia Vertinsky

    Got muscles? Expect scrutiny if you’re female. Venus with Biceps interrogates the history and taboos of female muscularity and pairs a taut consideration with a diligent pictorial unearthing. This welcome book is interspersed with chapters outlining the limited perceptions placed on women’s bodies and how they have progressed, regressed and progressed again. David L. Chapman, […]

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  • D.M. Fraser Ignorant Armies: a consideration

    Click here to read my piece on Fraser’s Ignorant Armies (Pulp Press)

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  • London Review of Books: Things to do when you’re dead in Vancouver

    Here’s a link to my first London Review of Books piece: on thanataphobia and funerals and feet.

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  • James Kelman Kieron Smith, Boy

    I have a theory — I revise my theories four times a day — but this one persists. If you’re going to write working-class stories, they had better arrive beyond bloody brilliant, because stick-handling them past the gatekeepers of the predominantly middle-class publishing industry will require a shot that lands right between the eyes. In […]

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  • Pumped up prose captures the essence of being 15

    Every now and then, a novel that is as solid as steel lands in readers’ hands. A novel needs the right proportion of its own hardening agents to deliver on the page. The Mitochondrial Curiosities of Marcels 1-19 is such a book. As is appropriate for a book with a biological title, Jocelyn Brown’s young-adult […]

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  • Hardship, Heroism and Heartbreak

    A memoir about a family member and a historic event offers a double burden to its author: that of dual responsibility to the family member and to wider interest in the event. When the relative is a member of Robert Falcon Scott’s 1911 expedition to the Antarctic, you’re staring down quite the load to distribute. […]

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  • Young readers: Can’t get your kid to read? Graphic novels for young readers

    High school English teacher Guy Demers doesn’t hesitate to recommend graphic novels for young readers. “Comics are an art form, much like the novel or poetry,” he says. “They offer us new ways to read and to put together meaning. “The richness in subject matter and approach has given us a body of work that […]

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  • Summer reading: Banish boredom with lively literature

    To Jocelyn Brown, the Edmonton-based author of a unique new young-adult novel, summer reading in childhood meant “days long and spacious enough for fiction to feel real and reality to feel hazy and strange …. On camping trips with my father, in the tent my five sisters and I fought for space and terrified ourselves […]

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  • Buried Treasure: Taxi! by Helen Potrebenko (Globe and Mail)

    Reader, hail that cab! Anakana Schofield Published on Friday, Jul. 24, 2009 Amid the archeology of literature, there are novels easily found, gauzed only by a light crumble of soil, and there are true artifacts: buried six feet under. Their chance encounter is particularly worth talking about because one has to wonder how in the […]

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  • The Gathering Anne Enright

    THE GATHERING By Anne Enright Black Cat, 261 pages, $17.50   Anne Enright’s Man Booker short-listed novel The Gathering may well polarize readers in the same way childhood experiences divide families into distinct camps. One side will hold its gaze and sit mucho satisfied at the table, another group with less robust constitutions may be unable […]

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  • On the ambition of being a great reader

    Let the greats explain the novel to you: Apply the insights of Milan Kundera and Francine Prose to your reading and writing. British poet and author Ian Patterson thinks daily and deeply about novels. Whether he’s stuffing a chicken to roast or teaching his students in the English department at Cambridge University, the novel is […]

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  • Reluctant readers: High interest boys books

    First, just connect; Picking the right book for a boy means finding ‘the right level of reading and the right level of interest’ When British writer Val Wilding got the idea for her Toby Tucker books, about a boy who becomes his ancestors, she wanted to make them attractive to boys, especially those who are […]

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  • Hugo Hamilton: The Sailor in the Wardrobe

    D7 THE GLOBE AND MAIL SATURDAY, JUNE 17, 2006 MEMOIR Trapped between cultures  The Sailor in the Wardrobe By Hugo Hamilton Fourth Estate, 263 pages, $38.95 Reviewed By Anakana Schofield.   For complicated historical reasons, an Gaeilge, the Irish language, has on occasion attracted a certain brand of nutter. Rather than being a useful entity […]

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  • BECKETT REMEMBERING, REMEMBERING BECKETT — Edited by James and Elizabeth Knowlson

    BECKETT REMEMBERING, REMEMBERING BECKETT – Uncollected interviews with Samuel Beckett & Memories of Those Who Knew Him Edited by James and Elizabeth Knowlson. (Bloomsbury/Raincoast 313 pages), Published in Vancouver Sun (July 2006) Review by Anakana Schofield. For Samuel Beckett enthusiasts, unable to hop across the water to Dublin for the Beckett centenary celebrations, the arrival this month […]

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  • Jeanette Winterson: Tanglewreck

    Misbehaving time   Tanglewreck By Jeanette Winterson Bloomsbury, 416 pages, $14.95 Jeanette Winterson is a writer many of us had been hoping our children would grow up to read. She has just sliced a significant number of years off the wait by writing Tanglewreck, a novel children ages 9 and upward will actually want to […]

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